Skip to main content
All Posts By

OpenSSF

Open Source Security Foundation Attracts New Commitments, Advances Key Initiatives in Weeks Since White House Security Summit

By Press Release

SAN FRANCISCO, March 1, 2022, The Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) a cross-industry organization hosted at the Linux Foundation that brings together the world’s most important open source security initiatives, today announced 20 new organizations have joined OpenSSF to help identify and fix security vulnerabilities in open source software and develop improved tooling, training, research, best practices, and vulnerability disclosure practices. It is also announcing the latest milestones achieved across a variety of its technical initiatives, all of which underscore the cross-industry momentum that is taking place as a result of increasing awareness in the wake of recent security incidents and since the recent White House Open Source Security Summit and recent Congressional hearings. 

“The time is now for this community to make real progress on software security. Since open source is the foundation on which all software is built, the work we do at OpenSSF with contributions from companies and individuals from around the world is fundamental to that progress,” said Brian Behlendorf, executive director at OpenSSF. “We’ve never had more support or focus on building, sustaining, and securing the software that underpins all of our lives, and we’re happy to be the neutral forum where this can happen.” 

New Premier Member commitments come from 1Password, Citi, Coinbase, Huawei Technologies, JFrog, and Wipro. New General Member commitments come from Accuknox, Alibaba Cloud, Block, Inc, Blockchain Technology Partners, Catena Cyber, Chainguard, Cloudsmith, DeployHub, MongoDB, NCC Group, ReversingLabs, Spotify, Teleport, and Wingtecher Technology. New Associate Members include MITRE and OpenUK. For a complete review of the OpenSSF member roster, please visit: https://openssf.org/about/members/

These commitments come on the heels of the recent White House Open Source Security Summit, where the Linux Foundation and OpenSSF represented hundreds of its project communities and discussed how best to support software security and open source security posture going forward. This summit was a major milestone in the Linux Foundation’s engagement with the public sector and underscored its position supporting not only the projects it hosts but all of the world’s most critical open source infrastructure. 

Since the OpenSSF announced initial commitments in October, the community has continued to advance the OpenSSF mission. Some selected highlights include:

New Alpha-Omega Project Launches with $5m Investment to Improve OSS Security Posture

OpenSSF also recently announced the Alpha-Omega Project to improve the security posture of open source software (OSS) through direct engagement of software security experts and automated security testing. It is initially supported by Microsoft and Google with a combined investment of $5 million. The Project improves global OSS supply chain security by working with project maintainers to systematically look for new, as-yet-undiscovered vulnerabilities in open source code and get them fixed. “Alpha” will work with the maintainers of the most critical open source projects to help them identify and fix security vulnerabilities and improve their security posture. “Omega” will identify at least 10,000 widely deployed OSS projects where it can apply automated security analysis, scoring, and remediation guidance to their open source maintainer communities.

Automated Security Tool, Scorecards, Increases Scans from 50,000 to 1 Million Projects

Scorecards is an OpenSSF project that helps open source users understand the risks of the dependencies they consume. OpenSSF members GitHub and Google recently announced Scorecards v4, which includes Scorecards GitHub Workflow Action to automate the identification of how changes to a project affected its security. It also includes License Check to detect the presence of a project license and Dangerous-Workflow check to detect dangerous usage of the pull_request_target trigger and risks of script injections in GitHub workflows. The Scorecards project has also increased the scale of scans from 50,000 projects to one million projects. These software projects are identified as most critical based on their number of direct dependencies, giving a more detailed view of the ecosystem and strengthening supply chain security as users see improved coverage of their dependencies. 

Project Sigstore Sees Massive Contribution, Adoption to Sign, Verify and Protect OSS 

Sigstore recently released a project update that reported nearly 500 contributors, 3,000 commits, and over one million entries in Rekor. For more information on what is driving this adoption, please visit the Sigstore blog.

The “Great MFA Distribution” Distributes Codes to Claim Free Hardware Security Tokens to Almost 1000 Top OSS Developers

In the pursuit of encouraging wider adoption of multi-factor authentication (MFA) by developers of critical open source projects, The Securing Critical Projects Working Group coordinated the distribution of nearly 1000 codes for free MFA tokens (graciously donated by Google and Github) to developers of the 100 most critical open source projects. This dsiribution is a small but critical step in avoiding supply chain attacks based on stolen credentials of key developers.

To join OpenSSF and/or contribute to these important initiatives, please visit: https://openssf.org/

Premier Member Quotes

1Password

“We’re proud to be among like-minded organizations and individuals that share a collective commitment to improving the security posture of open source software,” said Pedro Canahuati, Chief Technology Officer at 1Password. “Much of the technology we use today is built on open source software. Given 1Password’s human-centric approach to building user-friendly applications, it’s important to us that its integrity and security is protected.”

Citi

“The security of open source software and its supply chain is an essential aspect to Citi. We have worked with the open source community on bolstering security in these areas, and we look forward to strengthening this mission by joining the Open Source Security Foundation,” said Jonathan Meadows, Head of Cloud & Application Security Engineering, Citibank.

Coinbase

“Coinbase is the world’s most trusted cryptocurrency exchange, and the security of our open source dependencies — as well as the broader crypto ecosystem — is paramount. The OpenSSF’s goals align with our own, and Coinbase is proud to be contributing to increasing the security of open source software for the benefit of all,” said Jordan Harband, Staff Developer Relations Engineer, Coinbase.

Huawei Technologies

“The importance of open source software security is well recognized by the customer, industry, and government. It is time for the community to take strategic, continuous, effective, and efficient actions to advance the open source software security posture.  We are very glad to see OpenSSF launching initiatives (Scorecard, Alpha-Omega, SigStore, etc.) to improve the open source software security directly,” said Dr. Kai Chen, Chief Security Strategist, Huawei. “Huawei commits to strengthen investment on cybersecurity and to maintain a global, secure and resilient  open source software supply chain.”

JFrog

“Open source software is the foundation of today’s modern systems that run enterprises and government organizations alike – making software part of a nation’s critical infrastructure,” said Stephen Chin, VP of Developer Relations, JFrog. “JFrog is honored to be part of OpenSSF to accelerate innovation and advancement in supply chain security. Projects coming out of OpenSFF help make JFrog’s liquid software vision a secure reality.”

Wipro

“With the increasing adoption of open source software and its growing importance in enabling innovation and transformation comes commensurate cybersecurity risks. The community needs a concerted effort to address them. We are excited to join the governing board of OpenSSF to collaborate with other members on defining and building set of solutions and frameworks and best practices to help ensure the integrity of the open source software supply chain and contribute our domain expertise, breadth of resources and global reach to this important effort,”  said Subha Tatavarti, CTO, Wipro Limited.

General Member Quotes

Accuknox

“In the Shift Left, DevSecOps Developer-led adoption of Security Tools and platforms an OpenSource led approach is imperative. We are thrilled to see OpenSSF launching path-breaking initiatives to help end-users and technology providers harness the power of open source and contribute to the collective knowledge capital,” said Nat Natraj, co-founder, CEO, AccuKnox.

Alibaba Cloud

“Open Source software has become a key software supply chain of IT, and Open Source software security has a huge impact on infrastructure security. Alibaba Cloud, as the world’s leading cloud vendor that always puts security and data privacy as the priority, is keeping investing in security research. For a long time, the public has felt that open source software is very safe because of transparency, all software developers can review the code, find and fix vulnerabilities. But In fact, there are many widely used open-source software that is still possible to have security bugs that have not been noticed for a long time. It is great to have an organization like OpenSSF, which can connect so many great companies and open source communities to advance open source security for all.  As a member of Open Source Security Foundation, we’re looking forward to collaborating with OpenSSF to strengthen the Open Source security,” said Xin Ouyang, Head of Alibaba Cloud Security, Alibaba Cloud.

Block, Inc.

“Block is very excited to join with other industry leaders to help step up the quality of open source security.  I strongly believe that as an industry, it is our priority to address security concerns in a supply chain that we all use.  We may compete on products, but we should never compete on security, and OSSF is a fantastic example of this idea,” said Jim Higgins, CISO of Block.

Blockchain Technology Partners

“Open source software is mainstream and underpins much of the world’s critical infrastructure as well as powering enterprises across the globe. Against this backdrop, OpenSSF’s mission to secure the open source supply chain is fundamental to our future,” said Duncan Johnston-Watt, CEO and Co-founder of Blockchain Technology Partners. “Collaboration is key to OpenSSF’s success, and so we are delighted to contribute to this initiative which complements our existing involvement in the Hyperledger Foundation, CNCF, and LF Energy.”

Catena Cyber

“Open source leads to a massive sharing of knowledge. Beyond the quantity of information, the quality of it becomes important to bring value to society,” said Philippe Antoine, CEO of Catenacyber. “We are glad to join OpenSSF to contribute to improving the cybersecurity of open source projects through fuzzing and other means. Let’s fix all the bugs!”

Chainguard

“Making the software lifecycle secure by default is increasingly critical as open source has become the digital backbone of the world. A vibrant, open software security ecosystem is essential to that mission. We are excited to be members of the Open Source Security Foundation and to continue working with the community to make the software lifecycle secure by default,” said Tracy Miranda, head of open source at Chainguard.

Cloudsmith

“Having a single source of truth for software artifacts has never been more vital to supply chains, especially for the open-source community. OSS engineers need trust and provenance, and a trusted source for secure end-to-end software delivery, from build through to production. At Cloudsmith, our mission is to evolve the cloud-native supply chain, making it simple for the OSS community to secure their software delivery at scale through Continuous Packaging. We are thrilled to join OpenSSF, and we look forward to being part of the continued mission to improve the security posture of open source software universally,” said Alan Carson, CEO at Cloudsmith.

DeployHub

“At DeployHub, we have been laser-focused on tracking the consumption of microservices, including their versions. These relationships make up our new application-level Software Bill of Materials (SBOMS). There is no better place to have this supply chain conversation than the OpenSSF,” explains Tracy Ragan, CEO DeployHub.

MongoDB

“As all industries increasingly rely upon open source software to deliver digital experiences, it is our collective responsibility to help maintain a vibrant and secure ecosystem,” said Lena Smart, Chief Information Security Officer, MongoDB. “You can have all the tools in the world, but at the end of the day, it is people across multiple organizations around the world working together that will ensure an expansive cybersecurity program. One of MongoDB’s values is “Build Together,” and we’re excited to join and further cross-industry collaboration to move the security of open source software forward.”

NCC Group

“Even if your code is perfectly secure, chances are it has vulnerable dependencies. And the number of unpatched vulnerabilities “in the wild” outpaces the speed at which the security community can patch or even identify them. Security, as it is practiced now, doesn’t scale at the rate needed to keep things at least as secure as they were yesterday, and we have compelling reasons to expect this to get even worse for defenders. However, through harnessing dedicated investment and coordinating industry-wide efforts to improve the security of the most critical open source components and find scalable interventions for the entire ecosystem, we have an opportunity to improve software security at a massive scale. But we can only do this together, and it is for this reason that NCC Group is excited to contribute to the work of OpenSSF,” said Jennifer Fernick, SVP & Global Head of Research at cybersecurity consulting firm NCC Group.

ReversingLabs

“The software supply chain has become a major risk vector for new threats, including those from the open source ecosystem. The inherent dependencies and complexities of the modern software supply chain means that companies often lack visibility and the ability to track each component through the entire software development process. Recognizing these challenges, ReversingLabs is pleased to join the OpenSSF and offer its contributions to the community that help drive the automation of more comprehensive software bills of material and mitigate software supply chain and package release risks,” said Mario Vuksan, CEO and Co-founder, ReversingLabs.

Spotify 

“As a technical community we all have a responsibility to improve the security and trust of an open source ecosystem that so many of us rely upon. Spotify has always relied on open source software, and contributes to the community through projects like Backstage. We believe open source software forms the backbone of our industry and we look forward to supporting the foundation’s goal of ensuring everyone can depend on a healthy and secure software ecosystem,” said Tyson Singer, VP, Head of Technology and Platforms at Spotify.

Teleport

“The complexity of modern infrastructure has broadened attack surface areas to the point where data breaches are just about an everyday occurrence,” said Ev Kontsevoy, CEO of Teleport. “These risks have been exacerbated by the rise of remote and hybrid workplaces. With an eye on global attacks, the open source community’s commitment to improving open source security is critical to ushering in a new era of computing. Offering a solution to increase security, ease usability, and help scale enterprise development access, Teleport is pleased to be a part of the OpenSSF.” 

Wingtecher Technology

“As a fast-growing startup, Wingtecher focuses on exploring the technologies that secure various kinds of open source softwares. We are excited to join OpenSSF and ready to collaborate with the community to overcome the emerging open source security challenges worldwide,” said Vincent Li, COO Wingtecher Technology.

About OpenSSF

Hosted by the Linux Foundation, the OpenSSF (launched in August 2020) is a cross-industry organization that brings together the industry’s most important open source security initiatives and the individuals and companies that support them. It combines the Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), founded in response to the 2014 Heartbleed bug, and the Open Source Security Coalition, founded by the GitHub Security Lab to build a community to support open source security for decades to come. The OpenSSF is committed to collaboration and working both upstream and with existing communities to advance open source security for all. For more information, please visit: https://openssf.org/

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation and its projects are supported by more than 1,800 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure, including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, Hyperledger, RISC-V, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

###

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contacts

Jennifer Cloer

503-867-2304

jennifer@storychangesculture.com

OpenSSF Webinar: Introduction to Project Alpha-Omega

By Alpha-Omega, Blog

We’ve scheduled a webinar on February 16, 2022 at 10:00 AM US/Pacific time for anyone who wants to learn more about Project Alpha-Omega and registration is now open!

Hear from Brian Behlendorf (OpenSSF GM), David A. Wheeler (OpenSSF Director of Security), and Alpha-Omega project leaders Michael Scovetta (Microsoft) and Michael Winser (Google) to learn more about near term goals, milestones, and opportunities for participation in the Alpha-Omega Project.

OpenSSF Announces The Alpha-Omega Project to Improve Software Supply Chain Security for 10,000 OSS Projects

By Press Release

Following a meeting with government and industry leaders at the White House, OpenSSF is excited to announce the Alpha-Omega Project to improve the security posture of open source software (OSS) through direct engagement of software security experts and automated security testing. Microsoft and Google are supporting the Alpha-Omega Project with an initial investment of $5 million. This builds on previous industry-wide investments into OpenSSF aiming to improve open source software security.

Widely deployed OSS projects that are critical to global infrastructure and innovation have become top targets for adversarial attacks. Following new vulnerability disclosures, adversary attacks can be seen within hours. For example, recently discovered vulnerabilities in the widely deployed Log4j library forced many organizations into crisis as they raced to update applications using the popular library before adversaries could attack. 

The Alpha-Omega Project will improve global OSS supply chain security by working with project maintainers to systematically look for new, as-yet-undiscovered vulnerabilities in open source code, and get them fixed. “Alpha” will work with the maintainers of the most critical open source projects to help them identify and fix security vulnerabilities, and improve their security posture. “Omega” will identify at least 10,000 widely deployed OSS projects where it can apply automated security analysis, scoring, and remediation guidance to their open source maintainer communities.

“Open source software is a vital component of critical infrastructure for modern society. Therefore we must take every measure necessary to keep it and our software supply chains secure,” said Brian Behlendorf, General Manager, OpenSSF. “Alpha-Omega supports this effort in an open and transparent way by directly improving the security of open source projects through proactively finding, fixing, and preventing vulnerabilities.  This is the start of what we at OpenSSF hope will be a major channel for improving OSS security.”

Alpha: Focusing on the Most Critical OSS Projects

Alpha will be collaborative in nature, targeting and evaluating the most critical open source projects to help them improve their security postures. These projects will include standalone projects and core ecosystem services. They will be selected based on the work by the OpenSSF Securing Critical Projects working group using a combination of expert opinions and data, including the OpenSSF Criticality Score and Harvard’s “Census” analysis identifying critical open source software.

For these selected projects, Alpha team members will provide tailored help to understand and address security gaps. Help can include threat modeling, automated security testing, source code audits, and support remediating vulnerabilities that are discovered. It can also include implementing best practices drawn from criteria outlined by the OpenSSF Scorecard and Best Practices Badge projects.

Alpha will track a series of important metrics providing stakeholders with a better understanding of the security of the open source project they depend on. The public will receive a transparent, standardized view of the project’s security posture and compliance with security best practices. 

Omega: Focused on the Long Tail of OSS Projects

Omega will use automated methods and tools to identify critical security vulnerabilities across at least 10,000 widely-deployed open source projects. This will be accomplished using a combination of technology (cloud-scale analysis), people (security analysts triaging findings) and process (confidentially reporting critical vulnerabilities to the right OSS project stakeholders). Omega will have a dedicated team of software engineers continually tuning the analysis pipeline to reduce false positive rates and identify new vulnerabilities.

Omega community members will provide suggestions on how to automate detection of security vulnerabilities in the future and more generally on efficient ways to implement security best practices.

Corporate Partnerships Are Key

The value of securing the OSS ecosystem has become increasingly clear to companies and organizations of all sizes. Microsoft and Google’s support of the Alpha-Omega Project with an initial investment of $5 million and committed personnel is jump-starting the initiative. Other organizations are strongly encouraged to participate as well, whether by committing volunteers or by direct funding to expand the number of OSS projects that Alpha-Omega can reach.

“The long tail of important open source software, the ‘Omega’ of this endeavor, is always the hardest part—it will require not only considerable funding and perseverance, but its scale will also drive extensive automation for tracking and ideally fixing vulnerabilities,” stated Eric Brewer, VP of Infrastructure and Fellow at Google. “Enabling automation will be one of the greatest improvements for open source security.”

“At Microsoft, we proudly support OpenSSF and the Alpha-Omega Project. Open source software is a key part of our technology strategy, and it’s essential that we understand the security risk that accompanies all of our software dependencies,” offered Mark Russinovich, Chief Technology Officer, Microsoft Azure. “Alpha-Omega will provide assurance and transparency for key open source projects through direct engagement with maintainers and by using state-of-the-art security tools to detect and fix critical vulnerabilities. We look forward to collaborating with industry partners and the open source community on this important initiative.” 

Learn More and Get Involved

For more information about Alpha-Omega, see https://openssf.org/community/alpha-omega/. Individuals interested in updates about Alpha-Omega can sign up through an announcements mailing list. Organizations considering sponsorship or engagement in Alpha-Omega should email memberships@openssf.org

The OpenSSF also encourages all individuals and organizations interested in Alpha-Omega to participate in its Securing Critical Projects working group

Additional Resources

  • Join the OpenSSF to take an active role in improving OSS security
  • Participate in one of six OpenSSF working groups to help improve open source security
  • Get involved in our OpenSSF events, planning committees, and Slack workspaces
  • Download our new State of Software Bill of Materials and Cybersecurity Readiness report
  • Get certified as a secure software development professional

About the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF)

Hosted by the Linux Foundation, the OpenSSF (launched in August 2020) is a cross-industry organization that brings together the industry’s most important open source security initiatives and the individuals and companies that support them. It combines the Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), founded in response to the 2014 Heartbleed bug, and the Open Source Security Coalition, founded by the GitHub Security Lab to build a community to support open source security for decades to come. The OpenSSF is committed to collaboration and working both upstream and with existing communities to advance open source security for all.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,800 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure, including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, Hyperledger, RISC-V, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at https://www.linuxfoundation.org/

###

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Reducing Security Risks in Open Source Software at Scale: Scorecards Launches V4

By Blog

Authors: Best Practices Working Group, Laurent Simon (Google), Azeem Shaikh (Google), and Jose Palafox (GitHub)

Today, two members of the Open Source Security Foundation, Google and GitHub, are partnering to release Scorecards V4, featuring a new GitHub Action, an added security check, and scaled up scans of the open source ecosystem.

The Scorecards project was launched last year as an automated security tool to help open source users understand the risks of the dependencies they consume. Though the world runs on open source software, many open source projects engage in at least one risky behavior—for example, not enabling branch protection, not pinning dependencies, or not enabling automatic dependency updates. Scorecards makes it simple to evaluate a package before consuming it: a scan run with a single line of code returns individual scores from 0 to 10 rating each individual security practice (“checks”) for the project and an aggregate score for the project’s overall security. Today’s release of a Scorecards GitHub Action makes it easier than ever for developers to stay on top of their security posture.

Helping Developers

Scorecards GitHub Workflow Action

Previously, Scorecards needed to be run manually to judge how changes to a project affected its security. The new Scorecards GitHub Action automates this process: once installed, the Action runs a Scorecards scan after any repository change. Maintainers can view security alerts in GitHub’s scanning dashboard and remediate any risky supply-chain practices introduced by the change. 

As shown in the example above, each alert includes the severity of the risk (low, medium, high, or critical), the file and line where the problem occurs (if applicable), and the remediation steps to fix the issue.

Several critical open source projects have already adopted the Scorecards Action, including Envoy, distroless, cosign, rekor, kaniko. The Action is free to use and can be installed on any public repository by following these directions.

New Checks

We’re continually adding new security checks to help developers assess risks to their projects. This release adds the License check, which detects the presence of a project license, and the Dangerous-Workflow check, which detects dangerous usage of the pull_request_target trigger and risks of script injections in GitHub workflows. Dangerous Workflow is the first Scorecards check with a “Critical” risk level rating, since these patterns are so easily exploited—with these workflows, a single pull request can introduce compromised code into a project. The new Scorecards check informs users of the existence of these vulnerabilities in their project and provides remediation guidance to fix the issue.

Scaling Up Data Availability

The Scorecards team runs weekly scans of a set of critical open source projects, creating snapshots of the security of the overall open source ecosystem at any given time. Over the past few months, we have increased the scale of scans from 50,000 projects to one million projects identified as most critical based on their number of direct dependencies, giving a more detailed view of the ecosystem and strengthening supply chain security as users see improved coverage of their dependencies. With Scorecards V4, the weekly scans now reflect the 0-10 rating scale for each repository rather than the pass-fail results of previous versions, adding more granularity to the data. The scan results are publicly available through the Scorecards API and on the OpenSSF metrics dashboard and Open Source Insights partner websites.

Growing the Community

Since our initial launch, we have been improving our codebase thanks to the expanding Scorecards community. In 2021, we grew to over 40 unique contributors, averaged over 16 commits per week (totalling 860 commits), and closed 270 issues. We warmly welcome new contributors; check out this list of good first-timer issues if you’d like to join in the fun. 

Here’s a few examples of projects that have adopted Scorecards:

“kaniko is a popular open source container image builder for Kubernetes, so it’s very important to maintain the security of the repository and the codebase. The ossf/scorecard Github Action takes care of this for us and continuously monitors the repository. It took less than 5 minutes to install and quickly analyzed the repo and identified easy ways to make the project more secure.” 

– Priya Wadhwa, Kaniko

“We rely on scorecards in distroless to ensure we follow secure development best practices. Secure source and config means safer base images for all our users.”

 – Appu Goundan, Distroless

“Scorecards provides us the ability to rapidly litmus test new dependencies in the Envoy project. We have found this a valuable step in vetting new dependencies for well known attributes and we have integrated Scorecards into our dependency acceptance criteria. Machine checkable properties are an essential part of a sound security process.”

 – Harvey Tuch, Envoy

Strengthening the Supply Chain 

We expect 2022 to be a year of growing awareness of the criticality of supply chain security. If your New Year’s resolution is to pay closer attention to your projects’ security, using the Scorecards GitHub Action is one of the easiest ways to get started. Just install the workflow on your repositories and follow the remediations instructions to address the issues that roll in. Each incremental improvement helps strengthen the open source ecosystem for everyone.

For additional information, head over to the release notes and, as always, please reach out with any questions or suggestions.

The OpenSSF and the Linux Foundation Address Software Supply Chain Security Challenges at White House Summit

By Blog

Today marks an important moment in the Linux Foundation’s history of engagement with public sector organizations. The White House convened an important cross-section of the Open Source developer and commercial ecosystem along with leaders and experts of many U.S. federal agencies to identify the challenges present in the open source software supply chain and share ideas on ways to mitigate risk and enhance resilience. 

At the meeting, the Linux Foundation and the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) represented their hundreds of communities and projects by highlighting collective cybersecurity efforts and sharing their intent to work with the administration across public and private sectors. 

Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin said, “Safeguarding critical infrastructure includes securing the software that runs its banking, energy, defense, healthcare, and technology systems. When the security of a widely-used open source component or application is compromised, every company, every country, and every community is impacted. This isn’t a problem unique to the US government; it’s a global concern. We applaud the US government’s leadership in facilitating a stronger focus on open source software security and look forward to collaborating with the global ecosystem to make progress. In particular, the OpenSSF is our key initiative to address the broad set of open source software supply chain challenges, and it was very heartening to hear our work identified and endorsed by other participants in the meeting as a basis for further collaboration.” 

Executive Director of the Open Source Security Foundation, Brian Behlendorf commented, “During today’s meeting, we shared a set of key opportunities where, with sufficient commitments from everyone, we could make a substantial impact on the critical endeavors needed to protect and improve the security of our software supply chains. The open source ecosystem will need to work together to further cybersecurity research, training, analysis and remediation of defects found in critical open source software projects. These plans were met with positive feedback and a growing, collective commitment to take meaningful action. Following the recent log4j crisis, the time has never been more pressing for public and private collaboration to ensure that open source software components and the software supply chains they flow through demonstrate the highest cybersecurity integrity.”

Brian continued, “Through efforts such as our working groups on Best Practices, Identifying Critical Projects, Metrics and Scorecards, Project Sigstore, and more to be announced soon, the OpenSSF has already had an impact on many of the key areas discussed during today’s meeting. We are ready to further these efforts and welcome all new participants and resources that this conversation and further such conversations may bring.”

Securing Critical Open Source Projects with Multifactor Authentication

By Blog

The Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) Developer Best Practices Working Group has undertaken a project to improve the overall security and integrity of critical open source software projects and their supply chains.  Dubbed “The Great MFA Distribution Project”, the group is putting hardware multi-factor authentication (MFA) tokens into the hands of open source software (OSS) developers and providing them simple ways to integrate them into their projects’ daily workflows. These tokens are provided through the generous donation of multi-factor authentication tokens from OpenSSF members GitHub and Google.

Supply chain integrity is more important and prescient than ever.  Supply chain attacks have increased at rates that parallel the explosive growth of open source software development techniques and code.  The OpenSSF was formed in 2020 from a broad coalition of industry and open source security experts focusing on different aspects of improving the overall quality and security of OSS through deep collaboration with communities.  As the foundation grows and evolves, so does the scope of projects the group collaborates on.  The OpenSSF’s Great MFA Distribution Project is one of several active projects focused on securing OSS.

Through the use of MFA tokens a developer, contributor, or maintainer on an OSS project can add extra assurance of their identity as they engage with code and tooling within their projects instead of just using a username/password combination.  For example, these tokens will eliminate the problem of attackers using stolen passwords to “take over” OSS developer accounts to release subverted source code or packages. This helps improve the trustworthiness of this software for downstream consumers, strengthening the chain of custody and trustworthiness.

The Great MFA Distribution project has begun reaching out to a list of identified critical OSS projects and distribution of tokens will be underway during December.  The MFA Distribution project offers no-charge hardware tokens to OSS project developers and maintainers along with simple documentation on how these tools can be integrated into daily development activities.  Details on the project can be found in the Great MFA Distribution project repository.

The World’s Major Technology Providers Converge to Improve the Security of Software Supply Chains

By Blog

Imagine you have created an open source project that has become incredibly popular.  Thousands, if not millions, of developers worldwide, rely on the lines of code that you wrote. You have become an accidental hero of that community — people love your code, contribute to improving it, requesting new features, and encouraging others to use it. Life is amazing, but with great power and influence comes great responsibility.

When code is buggy, people complain. When performance issues crop up in large scale implementations, it needs to be addressed. When security vulnerabilities are discovered — because no code or its dependencies are always perfect — they need to be remediated quickly to keep your community safe.  

To help open source projects better address some of the responsibilities tied to security, many communities hosted by the Linux Foundation have invested countless hours, resources, and code into some important efforts. We’ve worked to improve the security of the Linux kernel, hosted Let’s Encrypt and sigstore, helped steward the ISO standardization for SPDX, and brought together a community building metrics for OSS health and risk through the CHAOSS project — among many others.

Today, we are taking steps with many leading organizations around the world to enhance the security of software supply chains. The Linux Foundation has raised $10 million in new investments to expand and support the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) and its initiatives. This cross-industry collaboration brings together an ecosystem to collectively identify and fix cybersecurity vulnerabilities in open source software and develop improved tooling, training, research, best practices, and vulnerability disclosure practices. We are also proud to announce that open source luminary, Brian Behlendorf, will serve the OpenSSF community as General Manager. 

Financial commitments for OpenSSF include Premier members such as AWS, Cisco, Dell Technologies, Ericsson, Facebook, Fidelity, GitHub, Google, IBM, Intel, JPMorgan Chase, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, Oracle, Red Hat, Snyk, and VMware. Additional commitments come from General members, including Aiven, Anchore, Apiiro, AuriStor, Codethink, Cybertrust, Deepfence, Devgistics, DTCC, GitLab, Goldman Sachs, JFrog, Nutanix, StackHawk, Tencent, TideLift, and Wind River.

To learn more about how to join the OpenSSF or to get involved in one of its six working groups, listen in to this brief introduction from Brian Behlendorf recorded this week at KubeCon:https://www.youtube.com/embed/Mjsb6Z1Weto?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&rel=0

In 2021, the Linux Foundation and its community will continue to support education and share resources critical to improving open source cybersecurity.  For example, this week, we also hosted SupplyChainSecurityCon, where the SLSA and sigstore projects were heavily featured.

If you are an open source software developer, user, or other community participant who just wants to help further protect the software that accelerates innovation around the world, please consider joining one of our six OpenSSF working groups, or suggest a new working group that addresses gaps in software supply chain security needs.

You can follow the latest news from OpenSSF here on our blog, Twitter (@TheOpenSSF), and LinkedIn.

Open Source Security Foundation Raises $10 Million in New Commitments to Secure Software Supply Chains

By Press Release

Industry leaders from technology, financial services, telecom, and cybersecurity sectors respond to Biden’s Executive Order, commit to a more secure future for software; open source luminary Brian Behlendorf becomes general manager

LOS ANGELES, Calif – KubeCon – October 13, 2021 –  The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it has raised $10 million in new investments to expand and support the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF), a cross-industry collaboration that brings together multiple open source software initiatives under one umbrella to identify and fix cybersecurity vulnerabilities in open source software and develop improved tooling, training, research, best practices, and vulnerability disclosure practices. Open source luminary Brian Behlendorf will serve the OpenSSF community as General Manager. 

Financial commitments from Premier members include Amazon, Cisco, Dell Technologies, Ericsson, Facebook, Fidelity, GitHub, Google, IBM, Intel, JPMorgan Chase, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, Oracle, Red Hat, Snyk, and VMware. Additional commitments come from General members Aiven, Anchore, Apiiro, AuriStor, Codethink, Cybertrust Japan, Deepfence, Devgistics, DTCC, GitLab, Goldman Sachs, JFrog, Nutanix, StackHawk, Tencent, TideLift, and Wind River.

“This pan-industry commitment is answering the call from the White House to raise the baseline for our collective cybersecurity wellbeing, as well as ‘paying it forward’ to open source communities to help them create secure software from which we all benefit,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at the Linux Foundation. “We’re pleased to have Brian Behlendorf’s leadership and extensive expertise on building and sustaining large communities and technical projects applied to this work. With the tremendous growth and pervasiveness of open source software, building cybersecurity practices and programs that scale is our biggest task at hand.”

According to industry reports (“2021 State of the Software Supply Chain,” by Sonatype), software supply chain attacks have increased 650 percent and are having a severe impact on business operations. In the wake of increasing security breaches, ransomware attacks, and other cybercrimes tied to open source software, government leaders worldwide are calling for private and public collaboration. Because open source software makes up at least 70 percent of all software (“2020 Open Source Security and Risk Analysis Report” by Synopsys), the OpenSSF offers the natural, neutral, and pan-industry forum to accelerate the security of the software supply chain. 

“There has never been a more exciting time to work in the open source community, and software supply chain security has never needed more of our attention,” said Brian Behlendorf, general manager, Open Source Security Foundation. “There is no single silver bullet for securing software supply chains.  Research, training, best practices, tooling and collaboration require the collective power of thousands of critical minds across our community. Funding for OpenSSF gives us the forum and resources to do this work.”

The OpenSSF is home to a variety of open source software, open standards, and other open content work for improving security. Examples include:

  • Security Scorecard – a fully automated tool that assesses a number of important heuristics (“checks”) associated with software security
  • Best Practices Badge – a set of Core Infrastructure Initiative best practices for producing higher-quality secure software providing a way for OSS projects to demonstrate through badges that they are following them
  • Security Policies Allstar provides a set and enforce security policies on repositories or organizations
  • Research – studies on open source software and critical security vulnerabilities conducted in association with the Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard (LISH) (e.g., a preliminary census and FOSS Contributor Survey)

For more information about OpenSSF, please visit: https://openssf.org/

Premier Member Quotes

AWS

“Open source software plays an increasingly crucial role across the whole landscape of information security. Convening industry leaders to invest in developing policies, practices, tooling, and education around open source security benefits us all. AWS was a founding member of the Core Infrastructure Initiative in 2014, and we will now build on the relationships and investments that continue the mission by joining OpenSSF as a Premier Member. With our partners in this initiative, and as active participants in many open source communities, we will help raise the bar in the security of open source software,” said Mark Ryland, Director of the Office of the CISO at AWS.

Cisco

“OpenSSF will enable the community, across industries, to build tools and practices to secure the software supply chain for open source and beyond. This is crucial to the future of API and application security, which are fast becoming a primary attack vector for all business going forward,” says Vijoy Pandey, VP of Emerging Technologies & Incubation at Cisco. “At Cisco, we believe the application experience is the new brand, which demands better app velocity, trust, security, and availability. This belief drives our deep investment in application security and full-stack observability, which is why joining forces with this prestigious foundation and group as a trusted advisor and partner was a no-brainer for us.”

Dell Technologies 

“The Linux Foundation’s focus on security is fundamental to addressing the increasing risks associated with software,” said John Roese, Dell Technologies’ Global Chief Technology Officer. “The Open Source Security Foundation’s work will help us collectively make sure critical software programs and the end to end software delivery pipeline is secure and trustworthy.”

Ericsson

“As a leader in mobile communication, pioneering and driving 5G globally, security is at the core of the network infrastructure we build and deliver to our customers. In an industry increasingly built around open source and open standardization we are fully committed to address cybersecurity vulnerabilities in a collaborative effort. We are proud to join the Open Source Security Foundation as a founding member and we look forward to continue to work with the community and wider industry for a secure software supply chain, including the open source components,” says Erik Ekudden, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Ericsson.

Fidelity

“Open Source Software plays a critical role in Fidelity’s technology strategy. We are proud to be part of the Open Source Security Foundation and to work with others to ensure that Open Source solutions and their supply chains are safe, secure, and reliable, enabling Fidelity to better serve our customers and clients,” said John Andrukonis, SVP, Fidelity Application Architecture.

GitHub

“The world runs on software, and most of that software includes and relies on open source,” said Mike Hanley, Chief Security Officer at GitHub. “As the home to more than 65 million developers around the world, we’re excited to continue partnering across the open source community and with other Open Source Security Foundation members to power a more secure, trustworthy future that will benefit everyone.”

Google

“We are doubling down on our OpenSSF commitment in the wake of rising open source software supply chain attacks and President Biden’s Executive Order,” said Eric Brewer, vice president of infrastructure and fellow at Google. “This decision is part of our White House pledge to spend $100 million to fund open source security foundations and follows a variety of investments we’ve made to support developers and security engineers across the public and private sectors. The OpenSSF is the best place for cross-industry leadership for these very challenging topics, and we look forward to working with the US and other governments to improve security worldwide.” 

IBM 

“IBM is deeply focused on developing and building highly secure hybrid cloud, AI and quantum-safe technologies that are designed to protect our clients’ most sensitive workloads both today and into the future,” said Jamie Thomas, General Manager, Strategy & Development and IBM Enterprise Security Executive. “As a long-time open source leader, IBM looks forward to working with the OSSF, our industry partners, and open source communities towards addressing the ever-increasing challenge of hardware and software open source supply chain security.”

Intel

“As a long-standing member of the open source software community, Intel contributes daily in the upstream projects we collaborate with,” said Greg Lavender, senior vice president, CTO, and general manager of Software and Advanced Technology at Intel Corporation. “Along with the Linux Foundation, we believe the Open Security Foundation (OpenSSF) is a unique opportunity to engage in projects and efforts focused on improving the quality and security for today and our future. Intel remains committed to providing contributions that benefit open source software supply chains and improving the security posture of critical projects on which our ecosystem depends.”

JPMorgan Chase

“JPMorgan Chase is deeply committed to working with the open source community to solve our most pressing security challenges. As a founding member of the Open Source Security Foundation, we have worked together to improve the security of open source and the integrity of all software. We commend the US Government’s recent initiative to raise awareness on this pressing topic and call to action the technology community to solve one of the most complex security challenges of our time.  We welcome the new members to OpenSSF and look forward to continuing the journey of innovation and bringing meaningful change to how we build, secure, and validate software,” said Pat Opet, Chief Information Security Officer, JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Microsoft

“As open source is now core to nearly every company’s technology strategy, securing open source software is an essential part of securing the supply chain for every company, including our own. All of us at Microsoft are excited to participate with others in contributing new investments to the Open Source Security Foundation and we look forward to building more secure software through community-driven efforts to create solutions that will help us all,” said Mark Russinovich, Azure CTO and Technical Fellow, Microsoft.

Morgan Stanley

“Whether we are leveraging open source in our own code, contribute to OSS projects, or consume OSS via technology we procure and utilize, the safety and security of OSS and the creation of a trustworthy supply chain is critical to all businesses. To that end, we are delighted to join the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Security Foundation project to collaborate with our cross-industry partners to improve the security, safety and trust in the OSS ecosystem,” said Neil Allen, Global Head of Cyber Security Engineering, Morgan Stanley.

Oracle

“As a contributing member of the open source software community and an inaugural Linux Foundation member, Oracle has a large number of developers that contribute to third-party open source projects daily,” said Wim Coekaerts, senior vice president of software development, Oracle. “Oracle looks forward to participating in the Open Source Security Foundation and working with other members to continue to strengthen the software supply chain, helping customers work more securely.”   

Red Hat

“Open source is pervasive in software solutions of all kinds, and cybersecurity attack rates are on the rise. Our customers look to Red Hat to provide trust and enhanced security in our open source based portfolio. Open source and community collaboration is the best way to solve big, industry-wide challenges, such as open source supply chain security. And that’s why we’re excited to join together with the Linux Foundation and other industry leaders so we can continue to improve the technologies and practices to build a more secure future from open source software,” said Chris Wright, senior vice president and CTO, Red Hat.

Snyk

“Open source is built by millions of empowered developers, who also need to secure this critical foundation of the digital world,” said Guy Podjarny, Founder & President, Snyk. “The vital work of the Linux Foundation and the OpenSSF ensures we collectively live up to this responsibility. The Snyk community is fully committed to this important, collaborative effort and we look forward to working closely with the other OpenSSF members to better secure OSS so it can continue to safely fuel innovation.”

VMware

“Every company that uses software should be concerned about their software supply chain,” said Kit Colbert, chief technology officer, VMware. “For two-plus years, VMware has engaged in contributions to open source projects in the broader software supply chain security space and invested in initiatives to help customers further strengthen their security policies and processes. As a member of the Open Source Security Foundation, we’re committed to collaborating across the industry to drive increased level of software supply chain security.”

General Member Quotes 

Apiiro

“Software supply chain risks are becoming pervasive, with the potential to slow application delivery and stunt innovation,” commented John Leon, VP of Business Development at Apiiro. “Managing application risk has become increasingly complex and requires visibility across the SDLC – including the supply chain. Apiiro is excited to partner with the open source community and support the Linux Foundation and OpenSSF as they power the collaboration that is vital to securing software.”

AuriStor

“AuriStor’s founders have contributed to the standardization of security protocols and open source development of security first software for more than 35 years. We view the OpenSSF, its working groups and projects, and those that participate in them as crucial to improving the security of every industry, service, and home. The OpenSSF has the potential to make a significant difference in everyone’s future. We encourage all members of the software development community to contribute.“, said AuriStor Founder and CEO Jeffrey Altman.

Devgistics

“We seized the opportunity to join this foundation because OpenSSF offers a real industry-neutral forum to accelerate the hardening and security of the software supply chain. Devgistics (formerly InfoSiftr) provides critical enhancements to the world’s most popular open-source repository. Devgistics has been involved in many free and open-source initiatives for years, including being a Moby (Docker Engine) maintainer, providing support to the Docker/container ecosystem, and serving in the Open Container Initiative. Devgistics continues to contribute cutting-edge solutions for security-conscious clients like the US Air Force,” said Devgistics Founder and President Justin Steele. 

DTCC

“DTCC is committed to developing highly resilient and secure code to safeguard the financial marketplace. DTCC is proud to be part of the OpenSSF community and looks forward to partnering with our fellow members on safe, secure and reliable computing,” said Ajoy Kumar, Head of Tech/Cyber Risk at DTCC.

GitLab

“As organizations modernize software development and shift security left, GitLab believes that open source will play a key role in fostering this modernization and delivering secure software with speed to the market,” said Eric Johnson, CTO at GitLab. “Supporting the Open Source Security Foundation aligns with GitLab’s mission of enabling everyone to contribute, and we look forward to supporting, collaborating, and sharing our expertise in implementing security in GitLab’s DevOps Platform to the OpenSSF community.”

Goldman Sachs

“Continuing to secure the software supply chain, in particular the many critical open source projects foundational to any modern organization’s IT architecture, is a top strategic imperative for Goldman Sachs, our peers, partners, and clients in financial services, the technology ecosystem, and the wider economy,” said Atte Lahtiranta, chief technology officer at Goldman Sachs. “This work cannot be done in individual organizational silos. We instead need to work collaboratively, across both the private and public sector, together with open source maintainers and contributors, to answer the call to action that is the recent cybersecurity executive order. The OpenSSF will provide an essential forum and associated infrastructure to allow us to share leading practices, develop improved tooling, and work together to better protect our digital infrastructure.”

JFrog

“Open-source software is the backbone of hundreds of thousands of today’s applications, making it critical that we do our best to flag new vulnerabilities and insecure components fast—before they compromise businesses or critical infrastructure,” said Asaf Karas, JFrog Security CTO. “We’re happy to expand our membership with the Linux Foundation and support this cross-industry collaboration to identify and fix open source security vulnerabilities, strengthen tools, and promote best practices to ensure developers can easily shift left and bake-in security from the start of application planning and design — all the way to software deployment, distribution, and runtime.”

Nutanix

“The world runs on open source software and Nutanix is eager to help ensure its security. This can only be achieved through broad industry collaboration. We believe in the founding vision of the Open Source Security Foundation. We hope to help empower open source developers and better protect all of our customers with the partnership it enables. As members of the Open Source Software Foundation, we join other industry leaders in strengthening the software supply chain security we all rely upon,” said Rajiv Mirani, Chief Technology Officer at Nutanix.

StackHawk

“Software development is moving faster than ever before. The industry needs tooling and processes to ensure that security can keep up with today’s pace of development. StackHawk is excited about the work that the Open Source Security Foundation is doing to improve security and we are proud to continue as a member,” said Joni Klippert, StackHawk Founder & CEO.

Tencent

“IT development to date, an increasing number of critical businesses and core competencies have been built on open source, and this trend will continue. As an important part of the software supply chain, open source security plays an important role in the entire software supply chain. Tencent Cloud has always been keen to contribute code and technology to open source projects, and also maintains a continuous huge investment in security. It is very gratifying to see that OpenSSF can be established, and we look forward to working closely with industry  partners to improve the security level of open source software and strengthen the software supply chain security,” said KK Dong, Chief Security Officer at Tencent Cloud.

Wind River

“As the dependency on open-source software becomes increasingly pervasive, the Open Source Security Foundation’s community-driven approach to developing and sharing security metrics, tools and best practices becomes an imperative. Our customers are actively interested in the health of the open source from which their solutions are constructed, and assuring secure development across open the supply chain is vital,” said Paul Miller, CTO, Wind River. “We are looking forward to collaborating more closely with the OpenSSF community. By working together, Wind River can provide customers with a level of open source security assurance that would otherwise be unobtainable.”

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,800 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure, including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, Hyperledger, RISC-V, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at https://www.linuxfoundation.org/

###

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contacts

Jennifer Cloer

503-867-2304

jennifer@storychangesculture.com

Announcing the OpenSSF Vulnerability Disclosure WG guide to disclosure for OSS projects

By Blog

Authors: Anne Bertucio, Christopher Robinson, David Wheeler, OpenSSF Vulnerability Disclosure WG members

https://github.com/ossf/oss-vulnerability-guide/blob/main/maintainer-guide.md

Vulnerability disclosure is the process of reporting, remediating, and communicating the details of a discovered vulnerability.  This is a critical component of software security both for the software communities that create the code as well as the downstream consumers that ingest and use it. It is so critical in fact, that it was one of the requirements of a recent United States Executive Order on improving software supply chain security. Vulnerability disclosure takes an organized effort on both the software maintainers and security researchers (referred to as “finders”). Within open source projects, this effort typically falls to the project maintainers.

A common saying in the vulnerability disclosure and incident response field is to, “have a plan before you need a plan.” Many open source maintainers have little-to-no familiarity with what a vulnerability disclosure plan should be. Maintainers are experts at creatively solving problems through code, not necessarily at being experts in the area of software security.  While many may have familiarity with secure coding concepts, they have little to no time for creating and drafting a plan for their project. The end result is open source projects without vulnerability disclosure policies, finders without directions on how to report, and users without a clear way to get information on vulnerabilities that may affect them.

Today the OpenSSF is releasing a guide and resources on coordinated vulnerability disclosure (CVD) for open source projects.  This guide was created by the OpenSSF Vulnerability Disclosure Working Group and has been informed by broadly-accepted industry good practices around CVD. The guide takes maintainers through CVD from pre-report preparations to publicly disclosing vulnerabilities, and puts the steps of CVD in the context of open source software development. The guide also includes commonly-needed policy and communication templates, such as a security policy (frequently referred to as a SECURITY.md), embargo notifications, and disclosure announcements. 

The Open Source ecosystem is broad and diverse. While projects may need to modify the resources for their project, the OpenSSF hopes that this encourages project maintainers who are unfamiliar with vulnerability disclosure to learn and adopt CVD for their projects, and simplifies implementation for the disclosure-familiar. These tools and practices can help improve the overall security and awareness of every community that integrates them on whatever level the project can.

This guide borrows the approaches of other open source project disclosure efforts: the Google Guide to CVD for OSS projects, the OpenStack Vulnerability Management Process, and the Kubernetes Security and Disclosure Process. 

This CVD guide is just one of many projects that the Open Source Security Foundation is actively working on to improve security within the OSS ecosystem. The OpenSSF is focused on the incredibly broad spectrum of open source software and seeks to improve the lives of developers, projects, and end-consumers of these fantastic communities.

The guide and resources are available on the OpenSSF GitHub.

Introducing the Allstar GitHub App

By Blog

Authors: Mike Maraya, Jeff Mendoza

We’re excited to announce Allstar, a GitHub app that provides automated continuous enforcement of security best practices for GitHub projects. With Allstar, owners can check for security policy adherence, set desired enforcement actions, and continuously enact those enforcements when triggered by a setting or file change in the organization or project repository. Allstar will help the open source community proactively reduce security risk while adding as little friction as possible.

Allstar is a companion to Security Scorecards, an automated tool that assesses risk to a repository and its dependencies. Security Scorecards checks a number of important heuristics (currently 18), such as whether the project uses branch protection, cryptographically signs release artifacts, or requires code review. From these scores, users can understand specific areas to improve in order to strengthen the security posture of their project. From here, Allstar takes the next step and allows maintainers to opt into automated enforcement of specific checks. If your repository fails a particular check that you enable, Allstar intervenes to make the necessary changes to remediate the issue, avoiding the extra effort of regular manual fixes. In short, Security Scorecards helps you measure your current security posture against where you want to be; Allstar helps you get there.

Continuous Automated Enforcement

Allstar works by continuously checking expected GitHub API states and repository file contents (repository settings, branch settings, workflow settings) against defined security policies and applying enforcement actions (filing issues, changing the settings) when expected states do not match the policies. The continuous nature of the enforcement protects against stealthy attacks that human enforcement might not notice: Allstar will detect and respond to a policy violation if someone, for example, temporarily disables branch protections in order to commit a malicious change before reenabling the protections. 

OpenSSF runs an Allstar instance that anyone can install and use. However, you can create and run your own Allstar instance for security or customization reasons.

User-Defined Enforcement Actions

Allstar lets you pick the enforcement actions that make sense for the organization, the repository, and the specific policies you’ve enabled. The following enforcement actions are available today, with more planned for the future:

  • Log the security policy adherence failure with no additional action
  • Open a GitHub issue
  • Revert the modified GitHub policy setting to match the original Allstar configuration

Security Policy Enforcements Available Today

A limited number of security policy checks are currently enforced by Allstar, with additional policies planned in the coming months. Here’s what’s up and running so far:

Branch Protection

Branch protection sets requirements before a collaborator can push changes to a branch in your repository. Allstar can enforce the following requirements:

  • Require approval on pull requests, which helps meet the code review requirement for Supply-chain Levels for Software Artifacts (SLSA)
  • Set a number of required pull request approvals
  • Dismiss stale pull request approvals
  • Block force pushes

Security Policy

A defined policy for responsible vulnerability disclosure helps protect the users of your project, ensuring that you have a chance to remediate an issue before public disclosure. Allstar can enforce the presence of a security policy file (SECURITY.md).

Outside Collaborator Administrators

Allstar can enforce a requirement that users with administrator privileges on a repository be members of the owning organization. It can also disallow push access for outside collaborators. 

Binary Artifacts

Binary artifacts in a repository are threat vectors that cannot be accurately reviewed by a human. Allstar will detect these and alert the user if found.

What’s Next

Here are some of the enforcements we’re looking to build in future releases:

Automatic Dependency Update

Security vulnerabilities are regularly discovered and fixed in open source packages. Automatically updating your dependencies helps keep known vulnerabilities out of your project. Allstar will be able to ensure that automatic dependency updates via Dependabot or Renovate are enabled on your repository.

Frozen Dependencies

Automatic incorporation of new dependency versions without review is an attack vector. A lock file or similar language-specific pinning file can protect against a compromised dependency release making its way into your project. Allstar will be able to detect and enforce the presence of language-specific dependency pinning.

Get Involved

Allstar is still in the early stages of development, so we welcome adoption and community feedback. You can get started using Allstar and help improve it by submitting issues and/or pull requests for new additions. We look forward to rolling out more enforcements; in the meanwhile, taking simple steps like enforcing code review and setting branch protections can make a significant difference in protecting against supply-chain attacks. Taking these fundamental actions together can help raise the bar for security standards in open source software.